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RFID Technology’s Impact on Inventory Management

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Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology, once a novelty, has now become an important part of inventory management in the logistics sector. By employing electromagnetic fields to automatically identify and track tags attached to objects, RFID has significantly enhanced the efficiency and accuracy of inventory tracking and management.

How RFID technology works

RFID technology operates through two primary components, these being, RFID tags and RFID readers. Each RFID tag, attached to an object, contains a microchip that stores specific information about the object.

The RFID reader emits radio waves that activate the tag, prompting it to transmit the information stored on its microchip. This information is then captured by the RFID reader.

As this process does not require direct line-of-sight, RFID can accurately and efficiently track and identify objects, even within a crowded, cluttered, or concealed environment. This capability is utilised in sectors such as inventory management, asset tracking, and access control.

Passive RFID VS Active RFID

The difference between passive and active RFID is mainly the range and power source difference. Essentially passive RFID gets its energy from the RFID reader when the RFID tag comes near the tag reader, while active RFID contains an internal battery.

Active RFID contains its power source and does not rely on the tag reader for any additional source of power.

Differences Between Passive & Active RFID

Passive RFID

  • Shorter signal range of 3 meters
  • Cheaper
  • Limited to around 128kb of data
  • Smaller size
  • High total lifespan typically 20 years

Active RFID

  • Longer signal range of 100 meters
  • More expensive
  • Able to store more data.
  • Larger size
  • Short total lifespan typically 5 years

When it comes to inventory management, the choice ultimately depends on the situation. For efficient management, we require an RFID solution that can be deployed in large quantities, remains cost-effective, and accurately identifies individual items. This makes the passive RFID the most suitable for large-scale inventory management.

The Emergence of RFID in Inventory Management

Traditional inventory management processes were labour-intensive, time-consuming, and prone to human error. This is where RFID technology made its mark, offering an automated and more accurate system for tracking goods.

Through RFID, logistics companies can easily track every product in real-time, from the moment it leaves the production line to the point it reaches the end consumer.

RFID technology encompasses two key components: a tag and a reader. The tag, attached to the product, contains electronically stored information. The reader then communicates with the tag, enabling real-time tracking of goods in the supply chain.

Impact of RFID tags on Inventory Management

1. Enhanced Accuracy

The RFID system provides real-time updates on the status of goods, reducing the risk of stockouts and overstock situations. Its automatic scanning eliminates human errors associated with manual data entry, thus enhancing the accuracy of inventory data.

2. Time and Cost Efficiency

By automating the tracking process, RFID technology reduces labour costs and saves time that would otherwise be spent on manual tracking. Additionally, the improved accuracy helps avoid costly mistakes such as double shipping or losses due to misplaced items.

3. Improved Decision Making

With accurate, real-time inventory data, logistics companies can make better-informed decisions. For instance, understanding inventory levels in real-time helps in demand forecasting, resource planning, and reducing holding costs.

4. Increased Customer Satisfaction

RFID technology enables faster delivery times and reduces the likelihood of errors, leading to improved customer satisfaction. Furthermore, with the ability to track products in real-time, customers can receive accurate delivery estimates.

5. Enhanced Security

RFID tags are difficult to duplicate, making them an effective tool against counterfeiting and theft. They also provide a clear trail of product movement, further improving security.

Conclusion

RFID technology has revolutionised inventory management by automating tracking, enhancing data accuracy, saving time, and reducing costs. As RFID technology continues to evolve, we can expect even more innovative applications that will further optimise the logistics sector.

Despite the initial investment required for RFID implementation, the long-term benefits it offers make it an invaluable asset for modern inventory management.

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Logistics

Affordable, Reliable & Highly Tailored Overnight Road Services Delivers With Superior reach & in Record Time

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African man near transport trucks

In a world where businesses demand swift and dependable logistics solutions, Seabourne Logistics is leading with its innovative ONR (overnight road service), setting new industry standards, delivering goods punctually and rapidly expanding its reach to cater to a rapidly growing clientele.

Designed to provide quick and efficient deliveries throughout South Africa, reaching destinations typically accessible solely by air, the overnight service gives clients a competitive edge in today’s fast-paced market.

“The success of our overnight road service can be attributed to our dedication to quality, reliability, and cost-effectiveness,” says Garry Harris, Director at Seabourne Logistics ZA. “We understand that our clients’ success depends on their ability to have goods delivered on time and within budget, and we take that responsibility very seriously.”

Transporting goods overnight by road presents numerous benefits. The foremost advantage is its cost-effectiveness, offering potential savings of up to 50% compared to airfreight services. Moreover, it excels in cargo handling, boasting greater space and flexibility than airlines. This facilitates the transportation of hazardous materials and liquids, which may be subject to stricter airborne regulations.

“While road transport does have its limitations, it is considerably more accommodating, permitting the carriage of items like aerosols or lithium batteries that may be restricted on flights. Importantly, our service consistently upholds high quality standards, ensuring minimal disruptions,” continues Harris.

Seabourne have created distribution hubs and fulfillment centres which are strategically positioned across the country to cater to the growing clientèle. Not only has it increased the service’s reach, but also allows for more efficient transportation networks.

The company has invested heavily in the development of this service.  All linehaul vehicles are equipped with long-range tanks and anti-fatigue cameras that are consistently operated by a double crew, whose activities are closely monitored by a 24-hour control room.

Iveco Turbo Daily 50C 70 vehicles with reinforced heavy-duty tow bars and 1.5-ton trailers are operated within their warranty period on the overnight road service – ensuring reliability. The fleet is subjected to bumper-to-bumper service checks every second to third day, depending on the rotation schedule.

The vehicles have dimensions measuring 4500 (length) x 1700 (width) x 1900 (height), with a carrying capacity of 2.5 tons and 16 cubic metres of space. The trailers have dimensions of 3300 (length) x 1600 (width) x 1700 (height) and can carry 1-1.5 tons with 9 cubic metres of available space. To enhance their robustness, the rear sections of the vehicles are equipped with aluminium cladding walls and Marley-type floors, complete with sunken securing points.

“Businesses, driven by price sensitivity and competition in service delivery, are increasingly opting for this intermediate service that ensures next-day delivery,” explains Harris. “It holds great value in industries like the automotive sector, where the quick movement of parts is crucial. It offers convenience and flexibility, allowing for multiple deliveries in a single trip to remote places often left out from next-day delivery. Moreso, we’re constantly working on expanding our service reach and footprint across the country, providing our clients with a cost-effective solution,” concludes Harris.

The growing logistics company moved to a new and improved facility in November, doubling their warehousing space and preparing to further enhance their reach and maintain their excellent personal service.

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Logistics

Laser Cutting Systems in Shipbuilding & Supply Chain impacts

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Shipbuilding with large ship and man

Shipbuilding, a craft as ancient as our love for the sea, is witnessing a heartwarming embrace of old and new. Cargo ships themselves are one of many crucial parts of the supply chain.

We talk a great deal about the freight aspect of maritime shipping however one less studied element is how we can use certain technologies to make the creation of these fleets more efficient and the effects this has on the supply chain.

Enter the laser cutter, a modern marvel making waves in this age-old industry. Let’s dive deep into how this tool, with its humming precision, is becoming the best mate for shipbuilders and how the supply chain benefits from it.

1. Precision Meets Passion

Laser Cutters:

Think of Laser cutting systems as the skilled artist’s brush in a shipbuilder’s hand. Their finesse ensures that ships are crafted not just robustly, but also with an attention to detail that would make any craftsman proud.

Supply Chain Ripples:

Thanks to these machines, there’s less scratching of heads and more nodding in approval. Fewer reorders of materials mean smoother sails from design boards to docks. This also means less cost is wasted on reordering materials and thus a less expensive component of the supply chain is produced.

2. Quick Production Times

Laser Cutters:

These aren’t your granddad’s tools. They fly through sheet metal at great speed, proving that modern tools can keep up with the high seas demands.

Supply Chain Ripples:

Quicker construction of cargo ships means that more assets can be added to the existing supply chain expanding capacity and ensuring the supply chain can keep up with demand.

3. Less Material is Wasted

Laser Cutters:

]They’re the embodiment of ‘waste not, want not’. With their precision, every bit of metal finds its purpose.

Supply Chain Ripples:

Less scrap means not just savings, but also fewer headaches about what to do with leftovers leaving us with a greener production of our ships.

4. Every Piece in Its Place

Laser Cutters:

In shipbuilding, every section is a piece of a grand puzzle. With lasers in the mix, each piece of metal can be precision-cut to fit any section of the ship.

Supply Chain Ripples:

Fewer misfits mean less time wasted going back and fixing the problem. This is music to the ears of everyone, from the shipyard to the suppliers saving time materials and precious resources.

5. Remember These High-Tech Tools Need TLC Too

Laser Cutters:

As sophisticated as they are, they’re a bit like pets. Give them care, and they’ll purr (or, hum) along perfectly.

Supply Chain Ripples:

This means the supply chain needs to have a soft spot for machine maintenance, ensuring parts and services are always on standby to service the machines that improve overall supply chain efficiency.

6. Greener Supply Chain

Laser Cutters:

Beyond their precision, they’re a wink to our green future, less waste and more sustainable practices mean a greener supply chain as these tools begin to see more and more use.

Supply Chain Ripples:

As shipbuilding turns a shade greener, the supply chain is now on the lookout for eco-friendly partners. What this means in effect is that clients and brands who sway to the more eco-friendly side will be more likely to do business with a partner that shows an ecofriendly initiative.

7. Cost Savers

Laser Cutters:

They might ask for a few extra pennies upfront, but the symphony they bring to shipbuilding often makes it worth every cent.

Supply Chain Ripples:

With a vision on the horizon, there’s a gentle nudge for more flexible payment dialogues, keeping an eye on long-term gains.

Conclusion

In a nutshell, the dance between laser cutters and shipbuilding is a sight to behold. A balance of tradition and technology, proves that even in an industry as seasoned as shipbuilding, there’s always room for a new partner.

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Freight Forwarding

Risk Management Logistics in South Africa’s Supply Chain

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Pallets with 2023 supply chain challenges text

South Africa’s bustling roads, humming ports, and busy warehouses tell tales of a nation always on the move.

But amidst this hive of activity, there’s an underlying concern that often gives logistics professionals sleepless nights: crime, theft, and fraud. Let’s explore this issue, not just as numbers or percentages, but as challenges that have real-world implications for businesses, employees, and consumers alike.

Understanding The Real Threat on The Roads

Picture this: a trucker navigating a long and isolated route, the horizon painted with the setting sun, and suddenly confronted by criminals. It’s a scenario that’s sadly not too rare in South Africa. These aren’t just thefts; they’re personal stories of danger and loss.

Criminals are known to target freight vehicles such as trucks on our roads for their valuable cargo. This is no exaggeration but instead an ever-growing problem in South Africa. This is illustrated by the number of truck hijackings growing between a period of 10 years truck hijackings have moved up from 943 per year in 2013, to 1996 hijackings per year as of 2023.

The Ripple Effect of Theft and Fraud on South Africa’s Roads

1. Drives up Costs

Businesses often foot the bill for these unexpected losses and this cost is then passed down to the consumer.

2. Delays and Disruptions

A single theft can push back deliveries, throwing off schedules and disappointing waiting customers. Even worse as an example of the ripple effect, if the delivery is a critical product say parts for vehicles, we face the reality of employees not being able to drive to work if their cars need these parts, and a disruption to another unrelated parts of the supply chain as a result.

3. Causes Trust Issues

When incidents multiply, trust erodes. Customers might think twice before choosing a service with a history of frequent losses.

4. Insurance Headaches

As claims go up, so do insurance premiums, making the cost of doing business a bit steeper. which hurts large parts of the supply chain that depend on having valuable items insured.

Digital Threats in a Modern World

In an age where you can track a shipment on your smartphone, cyber threats have become a silent, invisible menace. From rerouting shipments to impersonating vendors, the digital highway has its own set of bandits.

Solutions

1. Stay One Step Ahead with Tech

Real-time GPS isn’t just a fancy tool, rather it’s your eyes on the ground, ensuring goods are always on the right path.

2. Empowering Our People

By educating staff and drivers about potential risks, we’re not just offering training; we’re equipping them with shields against scams and threats.

3. A Helping Hand from the Law

Strong ties with local police can make a world of difference. It’s like having a guardian angel looking over each shipment.

However, in the context of South Africa, it may be more beneficial to enlist the help of private security to guard your shipments, particularly if the items are of high value.

4. Bolstering Our Digital Walls

Just as we lock our doors at night, we need to secure our digital gateways with regular updates, strong passwords, and layers of encryption.

5. Safety Nets

Insurance isn’t just paperwork, it’s a promise of recovery. It’s vital to have a plan to bounce back when things go south.

Embracing Tomorrow

South Africa’s heart beats with trade and commerce. As we further carve our niche in the global market, our logistic pathways need to be not just efficient but also safe. Addressing crime and fraud is more than just a business strategy, it’s a commitment to our partners, employees, and every individual awaiting a delivery.

Conclusion

While challenges loom large, our combined efforts—driven by technology, trust, and teamwork can craft a safer, brighter future for South African logistics. After all, every challenge overcome is a story worth telling.

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